TINYPROreduction

TallER, thinnER, tallER, prettiER, richER, fastER, smartER, shiniER, costliER, happiER, quickER, biggER . . .

Competition is an ingrained way of life for many people. In “A Helpful Guide to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others”, Joshua Becker offers sorely needed advice to the more-is-bettER crowd and the perpetually self-critical. But what about less-is-bettER tinyhousers? Do we also have horses on the track, but trotting in the other direction?

smallER, tiniER, lessER, fewER, cheapER, lightER, healthiER, easiER, sustainablER (okay, I made one up) . . .

Those are “good words” to the reductionists amongst us, but empire-builders are equally convinced that their upward and outward trajectory is noble. The key is avoiding these imaginary races altogether.

http://www.becomingminimalist.com/compare-less/

I find evidence and joy in exploring the ever-expanding array of tiny house projects with their unique set of priorities, challenges and solutions for function, design, resources, needs and desires.

For me, the kitchen is centrally important and an old rescued solid oak countertop will cut across the middle of my floorplan with a bar-like flip-down appendage to maximize horizontal space for whatever project or event might happen . . . where others may have a concentrated bare bones food station (shudder!) but, say, a wide open living room with “real” furniture. For me, these kinds of comparisons are not hierarchical but inspirational and inwardly-instructive.

The most immense challenge, among others, in the process of moving toward tiny living is philosophical . . . knowing yourself and your priorities through a gradual, onion-like, Cartesian peeling-away method . . . a slow antidote to the unexamined acquire-to-death philospophy where you find you, not someone else.

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One Response to TINYPROreduction

  1. tinypro says:

    Tiny living leaves little room for the unauthentic. For some (many?), scratching the surface entails first removing a heavy coat of irony. Here is a good explanation and a great place to start (myself included):

    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/17/how-to-live-without-irony/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

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